How are you feeling?

Chapter 36: How are you feeling?

It seems this month’s Life Lesson is about quality of life and feeling good.

I recently started a new job with a local non-profit in the aging services industry. I am responsible for building and expanding the fundraising efforts that help cover the costs of providing day services to older adults. As a middle-aged woman with older parents who might eventually need these kind of services, I am watching and learning with keen interest during my orientation. Guess what? We cannot stop the aging process! Who knew? Therefore, when it comes to providing services for older adults, the key factor is doing so with dignity and respect — so their quality of life can remain good, and so they can feel good. And so that their caregiver can get some respite, knowing their loved one is being well cared for during the day.

adultdayimage

Thanks, Google. A snapshot from an adult day center, in another state, not where I work, because confidentiality. 

Do you know where else I have heard this lately? Earlier this month when Don and I were able to hear one of the leading NETs doctors speak. One of his main points was knowing how to treat the disease so that patients had a good quality of life and are feeling well. The cancer may be incurable but the treatment can still give patients a longer and a healthier quality of life. Dr. Liu’s key question is “how are you feeling?” which guides his approach to next steps of treatment.

This is so wise! How am I feeling today? Will eating that cheeseburger and fries make me feel good? Will putting off that dreaded phone call make me feel better or worse? What next steps should I take so that I am feeling well – both physically and mentally? In our 100 mph American life we are usually so distracted and stressed that we lose sight of making the choices that will ultimately help us feel better. Today I caught on to this month’s Life Lesson.

Our roller coaster ride with neuroendocrine cancer has also taken a nice turn. Don got a great report this month. His disease is stable – no new lesions and the existing lesions have had no notable growth in 6 months. We are grateful for knowledgeable and experienced physicians who know how to treat this disease and care for their patients with dignity and respect.

What helps you feel better and enhances your quality of life? Please comment below to tell me what comes to mind. I would love to learn from you and hear your thoughts.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s